5-Minute DIY: Stud Embellished Collar Tips

I do a lot of my own DIY projects because A. The things I want are usually never available, B. I'm cheap, and C. I'm broke (ok, not completely, but ain't rollin' in the deep). While everyone was rushing to their bogus Valentine's Day dinner reservations last night, I was working on a super exciting sample sale I'm doing next week. Decided to take a breather from that for a quickie DIY--and share it with you! I'm all about collar tips lately, so I'm stocking up.

I've seen other embellished collar DIY tutorials, but I don't really like using glue on clothing or using iron-ons. It takes a while to dry, things can fall off in the wash, it can smell, stuff can accidentally get stuck together permanently, the glue can bleed through, irons can burn, and if you don't get the right glue the color can turn a nasty yellow. I prefer the way I did it because if you screw up or want a change, you can take the embellishments off! Plus no glue mess or need for a BeDazzler; it's completely idiot-proof (although you could possibly hurt yourself, but the clothes will be okay!).
 

What inspired me to do this DIY was simply that my package from Forever 21 came yesterday. I know Forever 21 is trashy, but they DO have some good basic items ripe for embellishing on the cheap. I chose their sheer collared Longline High-Low Button-Up. It's kind of expensive for F21 at $19.80 (I told you I'm cheap) but I'm all about sheer collared tops so went for it.

Your Materials:

1. Metal pronged embellishments of your choice. You can find them at any Michaels, Jo-Ann Fabrics, or your fave craft store. The ones I used are some vintage diamond-shapes I found in the bead district in downtown Los Angeles. Whatever you choose, be sure they have those pointy spikes on the underside. You can also do rhinestones with metal settings, but they require a careful hand as you can scratch the stones with your pliers.

2. A good pair of "chain nose" jewelry pliers. They're the small pliers with sharp pointed tips and flat on the inside--not the rounded ones. You can buy them for under $10 (a MUST for all DIY-ers in my opinion, but then again I am a jewelry-maker). Again, any craft store that sells a good amount of beads will have them.

3. Collared shirt of your choice. I recommend finding a cool one at a thrift store so you only spend a few dollars total.

Once you've figured out how you want to lay your studs out,  push the studs through the collar one at a time prongs down. Be sure all the prongs pass completely through the fabric as far as they can go.


Be careful of your fingers, the prongs are sharp! Perforated leather is a good look, but not perforated fingers.



With your jewelry pliers, grab each prong and bend each them towards the inside of the stud. Hold the fabric taut around the stud so it won't fall out while you're doing this (I had to take the photo with my other hand so I'm not holding). Be sure to push the prongs down enough so things won't get caught on them later. But don't push them down so far that it causes the collar fabric to bunch.


The finished underside.


The finished product, ready to party! Don't have to wait for anything to dry :).

Backtracking: If a stud is misaligned or you change your mind about the design a week later, you can just use your pliers to upright the prongs and take out the studs like you would a staple. Simple! This whole project took me probably under five minutes, including adjustments.

I apologize for my crappy iPhone photos, I don't have any daylight when I come home from the day job. Plus the walls around my work table are neon green (don't ask) so that combined with the tungsten lighting makes everything so brassy.

Leave a comment below if you have any questions and follow me on Instagram: KidViskous for daily updates. And be sure to enter our 'I Hate Mondays' contest, click the link on the sidebar to learn more!

Day 2: Geniune Lady Gaga Platforms from Noritaka Tatehana

So, I started off writing the second of our "12 Days of Xmas" posts about a pair of shoes my friend Dominique of the stunning wedding photography duo Love Me Sailor and I recently saw ("we were ready to pull a bitch by her hair out of the dance cage at Rhondavous for wearing the shoes we had been lusting after"). But after some research, I've discovered something better. MUCH better. Behold, the work of platform shoe artist and Lady Gaga cobbler Noritaka Tatehana


If you can't control your boner for Tatehana's work like I can't...

Click through to read more:


Now, none of Noritaka Tatehana's shoes are for the faint of foot, but I like to think I've been working towards my platform blackbelt. Tatehana's shoes are stunning, gravity-defying explorations of fashion, whose conceptual designs are on the cusp of art. Archival pieces are currently being exhibited at the Comme des Garcons Trading Museum and shop in their Paris and Tokyo locations and Dover Street Market in London.

The young designer (a mere 26 years-old) was born in Japan and mentions his family came into money from the "centre of an entertainment and red-light district in Tokyo". The red-light district inspiration can certainly be seen in his work. Starting at 15, he taught himself fashion design and construction processes, later majoring in dyeing and weaving in college. Currently, every single one of his pieces are hand-executed by Tatehana himself! You can't ask for better craftsmanship for shoes ranging from $2,500 - $4,000. Many designer shoes are already in that price range, but can you imagine how much a shoe completely handmade by Christian Louboutin himself, or Karl Lagerfeld himself would cost??
The man himself, makin' your shoes


While no new collections are up for sale on his site, you can still special order pieces from the Tokyo  Trading Museum Comme des Garcons:

Opening hours AM11:00-PM6:00
2F GYRE Bldg 5-10-1 Jingumae Shibuya Tokyo 1500001, JAPAN
TEL +81 (0) 3 3486 8590 

Aaand for those of you who aren't quite up to task for Tatehana's shoes, or perhaps live in the real world and plan on walking on real streets, copy king Jeffrey Campbell's "Night Walker" shoe is a fantastic alternative for the much more affordable price of $170.00. While Tatehana's pieces are a crash course, Campbell's shoes are a nice, gentle beginner's lesson in footwear ergonomics without being ankle-breakingly dangerous (and nowhere near as gorgeous).

EDIT: My friend Joshua reminded me that Campbell's Night Walkers are a direct reproduction of another platform diva's go-to shoe designer Natacha Marro. That diva? Why self-styling fashion maven Ms. Daphne Guiness of course.